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What's the difference between an orthodontist and a dentist?

December 22nd, 2015

Orthodontists and dentists both help patients improve their oral health, but in different ways. Dentistry is a broad medical specialty that deals with the teeth, gum, nerves, and jaw, while orthodontics is a specialty within dentistry that focuses on correcting bites, occlusion, and the straightness of teeth. One important difference is that all orthodontists like Dr. John L. Studer and Dr. William M. Reeves are dentists, but not all dentists are licensed orthodontists.

How are they similar?

The main similarity between a dentist and orthodontist is that they both focus on oral care. An orthodontist can work in a dental office and provide the same care as a dentist. So in this respect, they are quite similar. They are both considered doctors, and deal with the teeth and gums.

How are they different?

There are more differences than similarities. An orthodontist requires additional schooling as a dental specialty; the situation is similar to a doctor who obtains additional schooling to become a surgeon. Another difference is that orthodontists specialize in helping patients with the alignment of their teeth, improving their bite, or fitting them for corrective braces and devices. If a patient has an overbite, a dentist will refer him or her to an orthodontist.

Dentists typically encourage good oral hygiene and provide services related to:

  • Tooth decay
  • Root canals
  • Gum disease
  • Crowns
  • Bridges
  • Veneers
  • Teeth whitening

Orthodontists are dentists that specialize in the alignment of teeth, and provide services related to:

  • Misaligned teeth
  • Crowded teeth
  • Overbite
  • Underbite

What an orthodontist can help with

Orthodontists help with crooked teeth, but they assist patients with other issues as well. These include overbites and underbites, crossbites, spaces between teeth, overcrowding of teeth, and the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Additional problems with the jaw also need to be treated by an orthodontist.

While a dentist may be trained to provide orthodontic care in addition to extractions, TMJ treatments, and fillings, trusting your smile to an orthodontist can better balance the different procedures you require.

To learn more about the difference between dentists and orthodontists, or to schedule an initial consultation with Dr. John L. Studer and Dr. William M. Reeves, please give our team at Brenham Orthodontics a call at our convenient Brenham, TX office.

Eating and In-Ovation®

December 15th, 2015

You want a beautiful smile that you feel proud of, but you’re not eager to give up your favorite foods for a few years during treatment with braces. If that describes you, In-Ovation self-ligating braces may be worth considering. Since treatment times with In-Ovation are significantly shorter than with traditional braces, you can get back to eating all your favorite foods much faster.

One of the challenging parts about getting braces is not being able to fit in. Traditional metal braces stand out in a crowd, but In-Ovation braces are smaller and have a lower profile, making them much more discreet. While you'll have to give up some foods, especially anything hard or crunchy, it won't be forever.

A Generally Healthy Diet

When life gets hectic, it’s easy to forget about your diet. That’s a mistake you don’t want to make while you’re getting your teeth straightened. Even though you’re working on obtaining a beautiful smile with In-Ovation, you need to eat a healthy diet so that your oral and overall health stay good. For example, consume plenty of calcium, such as from low-fat dairy products, to support strong bones and healthy teeth.

Timing Your Eating

Just like it is when you don’t have braces, it’s important to think about the times that you eat and drink when you have In-Ovation braces. When carbohydrates sit on your teeth for too long, bacteria in your mouth ferment them and produce acid that can wear away at your teeth and eventually cause tooth decay.

The following tips can help you avoid this problem:

  • Don’t eat hard candy or lollipops, since the sugar will be on your teeth for long periods of time.
  • Rinse your mouth out with water after you eat anything.
  • Brush your teeth after each meal.
  • Don’t drink sugary sodas, since the sugar will get all over your teeth.

Getting straighter teeth with In-Ovation is exciting, but you do have to take extra caution when eating, and make sure you take good care of your general oral health while you're at it. At least with In-Ovation's efficient self-ligating technology, you'll be back to eating popcorn and chewing gum in no time!

How to Avoid Delays During Your Orthodontic Treatment

December 8th, 2015

Our patients at Brenham Orthodontics hate the thought of delaying their treatments and often ask us what they can do in between their adjustment visits to help. Today, Dr. John L. Studer and Dr. William M. Reeves and our team thought we would provide some tips on how you can stay on track in regards to your treatment plan time.

The first thing we want you to do is keep your adjustment appointments. Each visit with Dr. John L. Studer and Dr. William M. Reeves is carefully planned to move your teeth a specific way in a certain time frame. It’s important to note that missing an appointment can add weeks or months to your treatment time.

Next, we want you to let Dr. John L. Studer and Dr. William M. Reeves and our team know right away if your experience any problems with your braces or appliances. A missing wire, rubber band, or broken bracket can delay treatment time, so we ask that you please give us a call right away to report any issues rather than waiting until your next visit.

Make sure you wear your rubber bands as prescribed by Dr. John L. Studer and Dr. William M. Reeves. Most, if not all, of our patients will need to wear elastics or rubber bands at some point during their treatment. Not wearing the bands or elastics, or not wearing them enough, can slow down your treatment time. Rubber bands are critical in aligning your bite and are important for the bite-fixing phase of your treatment.

Finally, we want you to maintain good oral hygiene, just as you did before your treatment began. In addition to flossing regularly, we encourage you to brush your teeth several times a day. Not brushing will allow sugar to wear away the cement on the braces, making them less effective in moving your teeth, as well as elevate your risk of developing cavities or tooth decay, which will inevitably delay treatment time.

If you have any questions about any of these tips, or if you have any general questions about your treatment, please give us a call at our convenient Brenham, TX office, or ask Dr. John L. Studer and Dr. William M. Reeves during your next adjustment visit!

What causes crooked teeth?

December 1st, 2015

Teeth erupt crookedly for a number of reasons that range from genetics to mouth deformities and serious oral diseases. When extra teeth or abnormally large teeth create a malocclusion (crookedness or misplacement of teeth), the culprit is usually genetic in nature. Other inherited traits involve jaws that are too small to accommodate a full set of teeth and misaligned jaws that did not form properly in the womb.

Can crooked teeth be prevented?

In most cases, underbites, overbites, and crooked teeth are genetically derived and can’t be avoided. Orthodontic treatment with braces will be necessary to correct the condition once the child is old enough to wear them. However, certain early childhood behaviors may also contribute to the development of crooked teeth that can be avoided. These include:

  • Thumb sucking and tongue thrusting
  • Losing baby teeth to decay before permanent teeth have naturally pushed them out of their sockets
  • Allowing pacifier use to continue after front teeth have erupted

Permanent teeth underneath baby teeth are directly affected by the health of baby teeth. If baby teeth are prematurely lost due to decay or trauma, permanent teeth will shift when they start moving upward. Baby teeth are like anchors for permanent teeth that help guide them as they erupt through the gums.

In addition, excellent care of baby teeth is vital to having healthy permanent teeth free of discoloration or decay. Harmful oral bacteria can spread into the gums and reach permanent teeth still buried in the gums. Once attached to a tooth’s enamel, bacteria will begin eroding the tooth even before it has a chance to take its first bite!

When to Start Orthodontic Treatment for Crooked Teeth

Dr. John L. Studer and Dr. William M. Reeves and our staff suggest that parents bring your child to Brenham Orthodontics around age seven to rule out potential issues with permanent teeth eruption. If problems are discovered, it is not unusual to begin orthodontic treatment at that age. In fact, specific conditions such as crowding and gaps between teeth are easier to correct at an early age.

Early treatment also benefits from the growth process of the jaw, which helps move teeth to normal positions.